World InfoZone - WIZ Around The World
Tuesday 20th March
Niue Information - Page 2
It is thought that Polynesians arrived on the island of Niue over a thousand years ago.

James Cook, the English captain, sighted Niue in 1774.

Niue became part of the British Empire at the end of the nineteenth century. Administration of the island was taken over by New Zealand in 1901.

In 1974 Niue became self-governing in free association with New Zealand.

Niue benefits from grants from New Zealand.

Islanders fish and grow their own crops. Bananas, coconuts, breadfruit, cassava, taro and yams are grown. Chickens, pigs, and cattle are reared.

Small scale industry includes food processing, the production of honey and handicrafts.

Ecotourism is promoted.

Niue earns revenue from its internet domain letters (nu) and the sale of postage stamps. Remittances from Niueans working in New Zealand are also an important contribution to the economy. (2011)

Music, song and dance are a feature of Niuean festivals and ceremonies.

Crafts on Niue include pandanus weaving and barkcloth or tapa. Examples of traditional tapa, known as hiapo in Niue, can be seen in museums in many parts of the world.

Niuean cricket is the most popular spectator sport. Rugby is also played on Niue.

The seas around the island are known for water sports such as snorkelling and scuba diving. Niue is also a good destination for big-game fishing and whale-watching.

All religious holidays are celebrated. Waitangi Day is on 6 February (1840). The Treaty of Waitangi established British sovereignty over New Zealand.

News from Oceania is available from Newslink.

Previous Page | Facts | Gallery
Niue Sections
Geography Environment
Architecture Population
Languages Religion
Food History
Economy Arts
Sport Holidays

Read Hiapo: Niuean Barkcloth

Gorham's Cave Complex

The Twickenham Tribune

Terms Of Use
Terms of Use and

Stockholm Challenge

Rome GJC Challenge

© 1997 - 2018 World InfoZone Ltd